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Somerset Richard Lowry-Corry
9 April 1835 – 6 April 1913

 

 


Born
9 April 1835 at Bruton Street in London, he was the eldest son of Armar Lowry-Corry, 3rd Earl Belmore and his wife Emily Louise Shepherd, youngest daughter of William Shepherd.
Education

Belmore succeeded his father in the earldom on 24 December 1845, at 10 years of age.

He was educated at Eton and at Trinity College, Cambridge, from where he graduated with a Master of Arts in 1856.

Married Lord Belmore married Anne Elizabeth Honoria Gladstone, daughter of Captain John Neilson Gladstone, MP, the son of Sir John Gladstone, 1st Baronet, and Elizabeth Honoria Bateson, the daughter of Sir Robert Bateson, 1st Bt. and sister of Sir Thomas Bateson, 1st Baron Deramore, on 22 August 1861 in St George's, Hanover Square, London.
Early Years

He was elected as a Representative Peer for Ireland and sat in the House of Lords from January 1857 until his death.

He served under the Earl of Derby as Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department from July 1866 to August 1867, and was then appointed Governor of New South Wales, on 22 August.

He was sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland on 17 September.

Governor of New South Wales

Belmore became Governor and Commander-in-Chief of New South Wales on 8 January 1868 at a time when the position was not yet just a figurehead for the colonial government and he was still an imperial officer responsible to the British government.

On 12 March 1868 he was attending a picnic with the visiting Prince Alfred at the Sydney beachside suburb of Clontarf when Henry James O'Farrell shot Alfred in the back and claimed to have intended to shoot Belmore as well.

Although Belmore did not see the incident, he arranged for Alfred's transfer to hospital for treatment and passed on to the colonial government the Prince's request for clemency for O'Farrell, which was ignored.

He worked effectively to calm the sectarian passions unleashed by the incident.

Belmore succeeded in having the Audit Act 1870 passed, which established the principle that government expenditure had to be authorised by appropriation through both houses of parliament, which had not been the practice until that time.

He found the Sydney summers oppressive and therefore rented Throsby Park, near Moss Vale, as his country house.

He resigned to protect his wife's health and to resume his parliamentary career, and left Sydney on 21 February 1872.



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